Dr. Melanie Wilcox

Licensed Psychologist • Professor • Researcher • Speaker

> Intersectional racial justice and whiteness work
> Antiracism and trauma-informed care

Dr. Melanie
Wilcox

Licensed Psychologist •
Professor • Researcher • Speaker

> Intersectional racial justice
and whiteness work
> Antiracism and trauma-
informed care

Melanie (Mel) M. Wilcox, Ph.D., ABPP

Assistant Professor, Augusta University

Psychologist, Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy

Formerly:

Assistant Professor and Director of Doctoral Training, Oklahoma State University (APA-Accredited Counseling Psychology Ph.D. Program)

Assistant Professor and Director of the Psychological Services Clinic, Louisiana Tech University (APA-Accredited Counseling Psychology Ph.D. Program)

Current Member and 2020 Chair, APA Board of Educational Affairs

Have served in several leadership positions in APA Division 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology)

Recognition & Awards

2022 Fitz & Linn Kuder Early Career Award for Distinguished Scientific 
Contributions to Counseling Psychology, APA Division 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology)
August 2022 

2022 Southeastern Psychological Association Outstanding Professional Paper Award for Multicultural Orientation in Cross-Racial Clinical Supervision Processes and Outcomes
March 2022

2020 Outstanding Publication of the Year Award, Society of Counseling Psychology (APA Division 17) Supervision and Training Section for It Takes Money to Make Money: Inequity in Psychology Graduate Student Borrowing and Financial Stressors
August 2020

2019 APA Board of Educational Affairs Cynthia D. Belar Education  Advocacy Distinguished Service Award
August 2019

2019 Early Career Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Counseling Psychology, APA Division 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology)
August 2019

2018 APA Early Career Achievement Award  
August 2018

I am a licensed and board-certified counseling psychologist, an accomplished and award-winning Assistant Professor and leader in the American Psychological Association. These were not foregone conclusions for my life, however. Although I had wanted to be a teacher since I was in elementary school and a psychologist since junior high, I came from a lower socioeconomic status background and received little support (and a lot of flak) in the bougie school district into which our home was mis-zoned. It certainly seemed as though “people like me” work service jobs (of which I worked many), not embark on higher education or professional careers. It was through corrective experiences in my own therapy and, eventually in community college and my four-year college that I began to find my way to the career I love. Now, I am committed to working toward a more just and equitable society through addressing oppressive systems and structures through my research, teaching, leadership, and clinical practice. 

I am a white, cisgender, heterosexual, lower-SES-origin woman with chronic health issues. That is, I am situated at complex axes of privilege and oppression, but first and foremost, whiteness buffers my oppression-based stressors. I have been passionate about racial justice since I was young. My mother, in her relatively short life, modeled antiracism for me in ways big and small. She taught me never to take the easy way out or to abide racism for my own comfort. It is because of those early experiences that I committed myself to antiracism work before I understood the ways in which I am affected by classism, sexism, and ableism. I remain as committed as ever to antiracism and critical whiteness work, and from an intersectional perspective.